Hagibis Magsafe NVME SSD Hard Drive Enclosure Review

I recently had the chance to review the Hagibis external solid state drive enclosure, a device that magnetically attaches to the back of an iPhone—or an Android phone with an adapter—allowing for video recording directly onto an external drive. You can see my full video review here.

The enclosure is designed to house a 2230 NVMe SSD which is not included. The choice of NVME SSD is important as the iPhone as very strict power requirements for externally attached drives. Hagibis put together a helpful video with a number of popular SSDs to see which ones work best. The enclosure itself is equipped with a sizable capacitor to mitigate potential power issues.

In my research, I learned that not all NVMe drives are created equal in terms of power consumption. A Kingston drive I initially considered was too power-hungry for the iPhone’s restrictions. But I did find a Lexar drive (compensated affiliate link) that, despite not advertising its power consumption, performed admirably within the setup.

The Hagibis enclosure also offers external power input through an additional USB-C port, a feature that ensures recording isn’t interrupted by power issues. This provides the option to mount additional accessories, like a battery pack, to provide the drive adequate power and charge the phone while recording.

But that power port doesn’t work for data transfer, so users looking to connect external microphones or other peripherals will need to explore alternative solutions like a USB-C hub.

Recording video directly to the SSD is an easy process now on compatible iPhones. Enabling Apple ProRes in the camera settings allows for external recording to automatically occur when the drive is attached, although the size of these files are enormous. During my tests, the Lexar drive and enclosure combo maintained its performance without any noticeable hiccups or frame drops, even during extended recording sessions.

Blackmagic’s awesome new (and free) camera app also supports recording externally with the drive. In addition to providing additional manual controls the Blackmagic app also allows for compressed video formats to be recorded vs. just ProRes on the native Apple app.

Testing the enclosure with Android devices revealed similar flexibility and functionality. Open Camera, an app I used on a Pixel 8 Pro, supported external video recording to the SSD. I’m sure there are other apps available too.

The Hagibis enclosure is a promising tool for video enthusiasts looking to expand their recording capabilities without being tethered to the limited storage of their smartphones. Its magnetic design, combined with the practicality of external SSD storage, brings a lot of convenience and efficiency to mobile video production.

Samsung T9 Portable SSD Review

I have been reviewing Samsung’s line of portable SSDs since their original “T1” released way back in 2015. In my latest video, I take a look at the new Samsung T9 – their newest portable SSD.

I purchased the 2 TB version for my review which is the sweet spot when it comes to price per gigabyte. It currently sells for $179 (compensated affiliate link) but prices will vary depending on market conditions, promotions, and capacity.

The Samsung T9 supports the obscure USB 3.2 2×2 standard, promising speeds up to 2000 megabytes per second. However, this performance peak is only achievable if your computer supports the 2×2 standard, which, as I found, is rare. Most PCs, including Macs and Windows PCs with Thunderbolt and USB 4 support, do not support USB 3.2×2, resulting in halved performance for the majority of users. This limitation isn’t unique to Samsung; other brands like Seagate, SanDisk, WD, and Crucial all made the choice to support this format.

In my tests using a MacBook Air M2 and a gaming PC, the T9’s performance was good but not exceptional. It excelled in sequential read and write tests but fell short in random reads and writes compared to competitors. This might affect users engaged in gaming or operating system boot-ups, where random read and write speeds are important. But these speed disparities will likely not be noticeable by most consumers.

Samsung’s Magician software works with the T9 (along with their other SSDs) which is a useful tool for monitoring the drive’s health and updating firmware. The drive also features hardware encryption capabilities, requiring a password for access, which works on Windows, Mac, and Android, but not on Linux or iOS devices.

Compatibility-wise, the T9 worked well with various devices, including iPhones, iPads, Android phones, and gaming consoles like the Xbox Series X and PlayStation 5. However, it’s worth noting that newer AAA games on the PS5 and Xbox Series S/X require faster storage than what USB can provide.

Overall I found the Samsung T9 is a reliable choice for typical tasks like backups, data transfers, and video capturing. Its performance in these areas is solid, and Samsung’s reputation for reliable storage stands. However, when it comes to random read and write performance, it doesn’t quite match up to its competitors, especially considering its price point.

For those seeking a portable SSD, the T9 is a viable option, but it’s important to weigh its performance against its competitors, especially if your usage involves intensive random read and write operations.

I Upgraded the Storage on my Production PC with a Great Crucial NVME Prime Day Deal

Ever since I switched my production workflow to 4k I’ve been meaning to upgrade the internal storage drive on my Vmix computer to a higher capacity drive. It’s not unusual for a single recording session to rack up 200GB or more of raw footage.

I’ve been using a 1 TB Samsung SSD for the job and it has performed admirably since I built my system three years ago. But during Amazon Prime Day I got a great deal on a 4 TB Crucial NVME drive. It’s still pretty reasonably priced now too.

Crucial has carved out a nice segment of the SSD market for people looking for high capacity storage that don’t necessarily need the fastest performance. This drive is very much in that market segment, delivering reads and writes at “only” about 2.6 gigabytes per second.

Newer drives running on the Gen 4 and 5 standards are almost exponentially faster, but this much capacity in drives that fast are prohibitively expensive for this YouTuber who works out of his basement. And as you can see here this low spec device can easily handle the 4k 30 video I record and beyond too.

Crucial also makes portable SSDs in this lower cost market segment. For example their X6 drive is priced very close to similar capacity spinning hard drives and delivers many of the speed advantages of an SSD. Are they as fast as some of the gaming and professionally oriented drives out there? No, but for many consumers they are more than adequate for the task.

Crucial is a sub-brand of Micron Technology, a well established chip maker that was founded in 1978. Micron manufactures the flash memory in their drives which helps keep costs in check. They used to make some pretty nice and affordable PCs in the 90’s too. In fact my very first PC laptop was a Micron XKE-233 that I reviewed a little while back on the channel.

I’ll be shooting some video on this new drive tomorrow so we’ll see how it holds up in the production environment. Stay tuned!

New Video : WD Game Drive P40 SSD Review

WD has a new USB-C external SSD called the P40 SSD which is the subject of my latest review. What distinguishes this one from the P50 we reviewed a few months ago is that this one is a little smaller and has RGB lighting.

I found the drive performs quite well for its stated use case: gaming. The random read/write tests on the Crystal DiskMark test suite were excellent. But I did notice that it was not able to sustain its write speeds over longer periods of time, perhaps making this a little less ideal for professional video capture applications that need 800 megabytes+ per second. I did edit a 4k video on it and found it to be very responsive with no lags or slowdowns.

WD continues to build drives that support the USB 3.2 Gen 2×2 (aka Superspeed 20gbps). This is different than the USB 4 20 gigabit standard that uses Thunderbolt technology. Most computers don’t support 2×2 technology (I have yet to get one in for review that does) so in most cases you’ll only get about half the state maximum of the marketed claims even when connected to a Thunderbolt port. In my testing we were able to sustain about 940 megabytes per second in reads and writes. Yes, USB continues to be a total mess for consumers.

The RGB lighting is not necessary but does differentiate the drive a bit from its competitors. The colors can be configured with a software control panel on Windows which will also allow connections to Razer Chroma, Asus Aura, Gigabyte RGB Fusion and MSI Mystic for color coordination with other RGB hardware.

The drive will work on Xbox Series S & X along with the PS5. But games designed for these next gen systems can only be archived – not played – off the P40. My advice would be to install the prior gen games on the SSD and play the new ones off the console’s internal drive.

All in this is a good choice for gamers but also for booting operating systems, virtual machines, video editing, etc. thanks to its super fast random read and write speeds.